The National Archives Begins the Restoration of the Acquisitions of the Library of Napoleon Museum in Italy

The National Archives Begins the Restoration of the Acquisitions of the Library of Napoleon Museum in Italy

Under Directives of Sheikh Mansour Bin Zayed

The National Archives Begins the Restoration of the Acquisitions of the Library of Napoleon Museum in Italy


Under the directives of H.H. Sheikh Mansour Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Presidential Affairs and Chairman of Board of Directors of the National Archives, the National Archives signed an agreement on executing a project to restore the acquisitions of Napoleon Museum’s Library on Elba Island, Italy; and to archive all of the library’s books and manuscripts electronically.

The project aims at enhancing the role of the U.A.E. in fostering and preserving world heritage and making it accessible to the public and the international community, especially because such acquisitions are documenting a significant period of people’s history and civilizational development. This is because the content of such books is rare and should be preserved and made accessible after renovation and electronic publication.

The project, which aims at preserving the cultural heritage and enhancing the global cultural scene, comes within the framework of the agreement signed by the National Archives, an affiliate of the Ministry of Presidential Affairs, and the Italian Ministry of Culture and Tourism.

H.E. Dr. Abdulla Elreyes, Director-General of the National Archives, signed the implemention agreement with the representatives of the parties executing the project and with the Director of the Napoleon Museum in Elba Island in the presence of the N.A.’s delegation members; H.E. Majid Sultan Al Mehairi, Executive Director, H.E. Dr. Abdulaziz Nasser Al Raisi, Administrative Development Adviser, and Farhan Al Marzooqi, Director of Corporate and Community Outreach Department.

H.E. Dr. Abdulla Elreyes said regarding the project, as per the directives of H.H. Sheikh Mansour Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, that the National Archives of the U.A.E. starts the project of restoring the acquisitions of Napoleon Museum’s Library, and its implementation will take one year. The N.A. adopted this project based on its strategic plan, which is concerned with developing its acquisitions of historical documents and increasing its specialized library acquisitions. The N.A.’s interest in books, which are important documents proving the culture and progress of nations, together with its firm belief that that preserving rare historical books leads to preserving the global cultural heritage prompted it to endorse this project.

Dr. Elreyes added that since we live in a small universal village, we consider the historical books that document the human development a mirror reflecting historical stages of human life. H.E. Dr. Elreyes thanked the U.A.E. Embassy, represented in H.E. Saqer Nasser Al Raisi, the U.A.E. Ambassador to Italy, for the precise coordination and the efforts that paved the way to this project, which has a great value for the whole of humanity due to its importance in the life of nations, people, and civilizations. H.E. the Director-General of the N.A. expressed his optimism that the project would proceed according to the plans and phases devised by specialized and competent experts to whom the implementation of this project was assigned, and he was optimistic that the execution will be a high level of perfection and excellence.

It is worth mentioning that the project stages developed by the N.A. started with initial analysis and preparation, next restoration, then digitization and software development, then printing facsimiles of the original books and manuscripts, and finally installing electronic monitors in the museum.

The project aims at preserving the cultural assets of Napoleon Museum’s Library, thus enhancing the dialogue between people due to its significant impact on bridging the gap between cultures. The U.A.E.’s acquisition of copies of the books and manuscripts, which will be restored, is a cultural gain and will enrich the National Archives’ Library with rare historical references.